Muslim world’s fallout with Live news



A rift between France and Muslim nations is growing after French President Emmanuel Macron said earlier this month that Islam was in “crisis”.

Tension escalated after French teacher Samuel Paty was killed on October 16 near his school in broad daylight. He had shown caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad to his students. Since the crime, French officials were perceived as linking the killing to Islam.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has criticised Macron, saying the French leader needed “mental checks” over his attitude towards Islam.

Across the Muslim world, some leaders have condemned France and Macron, including Saudi Arabia and Iran; while tens of thousands have attended protests in Bangladesh calling for a boycott of French goods.

2 mins ago

Parisians more concerned with COVID-19 than Muslim world fallout

As tensions between French President Emmanuel Macron and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan mount amid a debate over Islam and freedom of expression, some in France have offered an eye-roll response, while the French president’s domestic opponents have seized on an opportunity to criticise his failure to address the deepening crisis.

The fallout between the Muslim world and France continued on Tuesday, with anger rising over Macron’s recent speech in which he said Islam was “in crisis” globally, and amid renewed support in the country for the right to display caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad.

"This isn’t the time for this,” Silouane Tessak, a student living in northeast Paris, told Al Jazeera. “There’s so much going on in the world, especially with the [coronavirus] health crisis. Is this really the appropriate moment for a political spat?”

Others worried the drama was creating an unnecessary distraction as France deals with record numbers of new coronavirus cases.

Read more here.

Boycott of French goods: ‘This is the strongest weapon we have’

In Qatar, shoppers said they supported the decision by some retailers to withdraw French products from their shelves.

“I commend this decision by al Meera and I hope other companies will follow its example,” said Jassim Ibrahim Shahbeek, referring to one of the country’s biggest supermarket chains. “This is the strongest weapon we have right now.”

Omar Mbarak al-Ali, another Doha resident, said the decision was reflective of people’s position, expressing hope the boycott “will reach French officials and certainly make a difference.”

Doha residents expressed hope that the boycott initiative of French products would get their voices heard




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